CHESS AND STUFF

Chess is a two-player strategy board game played on a checkered board with 64 alternating color squares arranged in an 8×8 grid.

Chess had its roots way back in the 6th century 1500 years ago It was originated in northern India during The Gupta Empire where it was known as ‘chaturaṅg.”

Fun Fact: The name ‘chaturaṅga’ is inspired by the four branches of the army:

Chatur – four | Anga – divisions

The four divisions being infantry, cavalry, elephantry, and chariotry, represented by the chess pieces – pawn, knight, bishop, and rook, respectively.

The armies combating each other on the board consist of Black and White pieces. The White pieces form the one side, the Black pieces the antagonistic side. The two sides are briefly called White and Black. The coloring of the piece therefore determines its obedience and fidelity, unconditionally. A piece never deserts to the enemy, nor does it ever rebel; it is faithful unto death. True, if it falls in combat, it wanders from the board merely into a box where the captured pieces are kept until the next game; then it celebrates a merry and hopeful resurrection.

White and Black have equal forces. Each has a King, a Queen, two Rooks (or Castles), two Bishops, two Knights, and eight Pawns. Either party, therefore, counts sixteen pieces. The pieces stand on the board until they are captured, each piece on one square, no two pieces on the game square. At the start of the game the pieces are placed in a determined position shown hereafter, and then they are moved, the players moving alternately. Thus a struggle of the Chess pieces takes place according to determinate rules, until the King of a party is captured by force or the
contestants agree upon a drawn issue.

The pieces are usually carved of wood The King has the appearance of a crowned monarch, the Queen bears a smaller crown, the Rooks or Castles suggest sturdy castles, the Bishops have a characteristic headdress, the Knights show a horse’s head, and the Pawn is like a man without distinction, a man of the crowd, a common soldier.

(Visited 2 times, 1 visits today)